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Fuel odor in gas please help


 
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luv2yak
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Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Location: lawrenceville ga

PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2006 12:44 pm    Post subject: Fuel odor in gas please help Reply with quote

I checked the oil in my 89 xj 4.0 to notice a pretty strong gas odor i'm not sure is this serious or am I worrying for nothing I recently had the heads off, cleaned, and a new gasket installed any help from the xj gurus would be appreciated
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c130herc
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Joined: 11 Oct 2006
Location: North Texas

PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2006 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds like some rings are going or the gaps are lined up on them and letting fuel blow by into the crankcase. Get a cheap compression guage and a Haynes Manual and check the compression in each cylinder.
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monkeyman3875
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Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Location: Charlotte, NC

PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2006 3:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just a quick little thing (that I learned the hard way). Any time you take the head off, if you suspect damage, then deffinately take it to the machine shop. That'll also help eliminate those problems when you re-assemble it.
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-130k Miles (and counting)-> let me know of any preventative maintenance you guys can think of. PM me.
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TheBrat97
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Joined: 28 Jul 2006
Location: Dallas, TX

PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2006 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

valve stem seal?
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DozerDan
What the deuce?
What the deuce?


Joined: 03 Jan 2004
Location: Where im at

PostPosted: Fri Dec 29, 2006 8:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How did the cyl walls look?

How is it running?

Gas smell in oil = bad

I would do a compression check, and keep a close eye on the oil, gas will break it down and make it not work so good
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dancerman
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Joined: 08 Jun 2006
Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Sat Dec 30, 2006 3:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fuel injector not seating (leaking) when engine is not running.
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Tardis
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Joined: 07 Aug 2004
Location: Ohio

PostPosted: Sat Dec 30, 2006 9:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

dancerman wrote:
Fuel injector not seating (leaking) when engine is not running.

I was thinking the same thing...Leaky valve seals, scored cylinder walls, bad rings, worn engine parts in general, have nothing to do with fuel 'dumping' into the engine/crankcase. The only way excessive fuel can get into 'any' engine is through the induction system(injectors). I had a Buick Skyhawk years ago that did the same thing. A bad fuel pressure regulator let excessive fuel dump into the crankcase which in turn washed the bearings. I changed the regulator and oil, no issue afterwards.

Look for the following problems on your engine:
*Leaky and/or leaking fuel injectors, injector O-rings
*A bad vacuum line going to the fuel pressure regulator
*A bad fuel pressure regulator
*A plugged fuel return line.
*Bad intake/exhaust manifold gasket (this can cause fuel puddling)
*Bad/faulty fuel pump relay(makes the initial 'start-up' fuel pulse too long)
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c130herc
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Joined: 11 Oct 2006
Location: North Texas

PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tardis wrote:
[Leaky valve seals, scored cylinder walls, bad rings, worn engine parts in general, have nothing to do with fuel 'dumping' into the engine/crankcase. The only way excessive fuel can get into 'any' engine is through the induction system(injectors).

I beg to differ. Bad compression rings will let gas get into a crankcase. Iíve had it happen on old rings and on a newly rebuilt motor until the rings set. Here is some info after a quick google search.
This may or may not be his problem but it can happen.


http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/22096
How do you know if your engine rings are bad?

There are two types of rings on a piston. The compression rings stop the air and fuel from leaking down the sides of the pistons and into the engine block. The oil-control rings stop oil from being drawn up into the combustion chamber.

If your compression rings are shot, then you will find your performance will suffer, and your mpg will drop as well. Your engine may run rough, and when you change the oil, you will probably find fuel mixed in with it.
The best way to check for failed compression rings is to get a compression tester. This is a gauge that measures the compression in a cylinder. Take out the spark plug from the cylinder you want to check and then connect the gauge. When you turn the engine over, this will show the pressure in the cylinder, and any pressure loss.

Here is another site.
http://www.aa1car.com/library/2003/cm90330.htm
Typical symptoms of worn rings include low compression, oil burning, spark plug fouling and elevated hydrocarbon emissions. Excessive blowby into the crankcase will also shorten oil life by dumping a lot of moisture and unburned fuel into the oil. The PCV system will help suck out some of the vapors, but the rest will form acids and sludge that can further damage the engine.
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Tardis
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Joined: 07 Aug 2004
Location: Ohio

PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I won't rule out bad rings, and I know what you're saying about rebuilt engines. Fuel will get into the crankcase during break in, that's expected. A compression test on his engine wouldn't hurt either.
What I'm getting at is 8 out of 10 times fuel in the oil problems are fuel system related.
My friends Ford 300/6cyl had piston skirt and ring material in the crankcase when we took it apart. It still ran decent, the oil was clean, it just had no power anymore. luv2yak's engine would have to be pretty beat to let fuel to get into the oil.
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Brad The Best
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Joined: 14 Jan 2007
Location: Kamloops B.C Canada

PostPosted: Tue Jan 16, 2007 6:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

it only takes one cylinder to let fuel into the engine , those stupid inline 6's run fine with a few cylinders with no compression (speaking about my own) .

compression test and then go from there , its a good test anyway . can tell you a good bit about your engine .

i doubt its going past the rings though . but hey who knows .
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